My kid and I wrote a letter to NASA, and a very nice scientist wrote back

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Enlarge / The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa looms large in this newly-reprocessed color view, made from images taken by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. This is the color view of Europa from Galileo that shows the largest portion of the moon’s surface at the highest resolution. (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)

I grew up on space books, Star Trek, and occasionally going to the Santa Monica College Planetarium. Space continues to fascinate me as it does many of us.

So as my daughter has gotten older (she’s now almost 5), we’ve been trying to read some space books together. If you’re curious, Ars resident space expert Eric Berger recommended The Jupiter Stone—it’s great.

Lately though, my daughter and I have been diving into some more non-fiction works geared towards her age group. We’ve torn through Astronaut, Caroline’s Comets, and The International Space Station. And on occasion, we tip toe into YouTube to learn about NASA and other space agencies.

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Source: FS – All – Science – News
My kid and I wrote a letter to NASA, and a very nice scientist wrote back