This nomadic group of people once feared elephants. Now, they rescue them.

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When elephants fall into deep holes, they often get trapped. 

Unfortunately, in drought-ridden Kenya, nomadic ranchers frequently have to dig deep holes to find water for both themselves and their livestock. And at night, thirsty elephants seek out these wells. The adults, with great long trunks, have little problem reaching the water, but the junior, inexperienced elephants can tumble in. If the animals can’t be pulled out, the elephants are forced to abandon their young.

Over a dozen of these abandoned elephants now live at the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, being taken on daily walks into the woods and fed milk with bottles. It’s a unique form of conservation, where the local Samburu people — a semi-nomadic pastoralist group — collectively owns, manages, and profits from tourists that visit the 3,400-acre property. Read more…

More about Science, Africa, Elephants, Wildlife Conservation, and Samburu
Source: mashable
This nomadic group of people once feared elephants. Now, they rescue them.